Why kit isn't important.

This week I took the family for a short break to Scotland’s Moray Coast. It was great to get away and see some places I hadn’t been to for a while, and for my children it was all new. I took this picture of Bow Fiddle Rock while we were there.

It’s unusual to find the sea so calm and although there wasn’t an amazing sunset to photograph I think the cool tones work well. While I was there I met two fellow photographers who were there to capture the moon rise - which co-incidentally was due to be visible through the arch at the time. As it transpired it was cloudy and the shot didn’t materialise, but it’s one I’ll keep an eye on for next time!

One of the gentlemen I met had an incredible Hasselblad camera, probably worth £50,000 or more, but I was flattered that he enjoyed looking at my image, taken on a camera worth about 1/20th of that. While I’ve no doubt he would get amazing pictures with his camera, what was more important was his knowledge of composition, light and technique.

To get this shot was tricky, I had to get very low to the rocks in the foreground and technically it posed a few challenges of composition and sharpness. But I did get the shot, and I would have got the shot with the £50,000 Hasselblad or a £500 DSLR. Achieving great images is nothing to do with kit, it has everything to do with the photographer - and the good news it can be learned! Workshops are a great way to learn, but so is just getting out there are trying new things. I can’t wait to come back to this spot again!

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Philip Prideaux